The by-lanes of Amsterdam

” Some tourists think Amsterdam is a city of sin, but in truth it is a city of freedom. And in freedom, most people find sin”

Where to go

Rijksmuseum

One of Amsterdam’s most popular attractions – and certainly its most important art repository – the Rijksmuseum (National Museum) was founded in 1798 to house the country’s huge collection of rare art and antiquities. The museum’s impressive collection includes a million cultural artifacts dating from the 13th century to the modern day. https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en

Dam Square

Dam Square is one of the most tourist-packed areas of Amsterdam, and for good reason. Its most prominent feature is the 17th-century Royal Palace (Koninklijk Palace), former home of the Dutch royal family and present-day venue for royal functions. Dam Square is also home to top tourist attractions such as the New Church (Nieuwe Kerk); Madame Tussauds wax museum; and the National Memorial Statue, which is dedicated to Dutch soldiers who lost their lives in World War II. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dam_Square

Van Gogh Museum

A must-visit for art fans and historians, the spectacular Van Gogh Museum has been one of Amsterdam’s top attractions since it opened in 1972. Dedicated to the often troubled life and extraordinary artistry of one of the country’s most-revered painters, this modern Gerrit Rietveld-designed structure is home to the world’s largest collection of Van Gogh paintings and artifacts, much of it donated by his brother, Theo, and other family members. https://www.vangoghmuseum.nl/en

Anne Frank House

On the Prinsengracht stands Anne Frank House (Anne Frank Huis). Dedicated to the all-too-short life of one of the world’s best-known Holocaust victims, this is the actual home in which Anne’s family hid for much of WWII. They were Jewish refugees from the German city of Frankfurt, and it was here that Anne wrote the diary that became an international bestseller after the war, just a few years after her death at age 15. https://www.annefrank.org/en/

Royal Palace

Formerly the Town Hall, the Royal Palace of Amsterdam (Koninklijk Paleis van Amsterdam) serves as the King’s residence when he’s in the city. Its construction was a monumental task when started in 1648 and required the sinking of 13,659 piles to support the mammoth structure. Based upon the architecture of ancient Rome, the exterior is strictly classical https://www.paleisamsterdam.nl/en/

Heineken Experience

The visit will help you learn how four generations of the Heineken family have launched, expanded, commercialized the top beer industry of the world. All glittering green and the free samplers are enough to make you high on a cold winter day. https://www.heineken.com/in/agegateway?returnurl=%2fheineken-experience

Vondelpark

The largest and most visited park in Amsterdam, Vondelpark occupies 120 acres and contains no end of fun things to do. In addition to expanses of green space dotted by peaceful ponds and traversed by ample paths, the park is home to a lovely rose garden featuring more than 70 different types of the flower.

Red Light District

Nowadays, prostitution is legal in the Netherlands but not on the streets. That’s why prostitutes in Amsterdam stand up behind a window and have their own room. The name of “Red Light District” comes from the red neon lights that highlight the 300 windows where women are working. Amsterdam has three different Red Light Districts but the most famous and the most attractive is the one located inside the city center https://www.amsterdam.info/red-light-district/

What to eat

Sstroopwafel

If you try one Dutch sweet treat, make it a stroopwafel. Two thin waffles stuck together with a layer of sweet syrup; these delectable delicacies are best enjoyed hot and gooey from a street market or bakery.

Dutch Herring

Raw herring may sound a little scary to the uninitiated, but every visitor to Amsterdam should give it a go. You’ll spot haringhandels (herring carts) serving up this Dutch speciality all over the city – ask for a ‘broodje haring’ to get the fish served in a small sandwich with pickles and onions

Kibbeling

If you’re not feeling quite brave enough to try raw herring (see above), then you can still get your fishy fix from kibbeling – battered and deep fried morsels of white fish; usually cod. They’re every bit as delicious as they look, and usually served with a mayonnaisey herb sauce and lemon. 

Poffertjes

These little fluffy clouds of battery goodness are served up at restaurants and pancake houses all over Amsterdam, but nothing can beat a bag of hot, buttery poffertjes from a street market vendor.

Dutch Cheese

Cheese is big business in the Netherlands, so don’t go home without visiting one of Amsterdam’s many ‘kaas’ shops or markets and tasting some Gouda, Geitenkaas or Maasdammer.

Bitterballen

So you went out for a few drinks. You forgot to eat dinner. Those 8% Belgian beers are beginning to take their toll. What to do? The answer is in the bitterballen. Delicious, deep fried crispy meatballs traditionally served with mustard for dipping – they’re the ultimate in Dutch pub snacks

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